Archive for the 'PhD Courses' Category

Jan 21 2016

PhD-course in Accounting Classics (7,5 ECTS)

Published by under PhD Courses

Course Director: Bino Catasús
Course coordinator: Linnéa Shore

1. Course description and instructions

Accounting Classics is an eight-day PhD-course spread over four seminars during the spring of 2013. The course is designed as a 7.5 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) accreditation and aims to attract PhD students who have an interest to get a broad view on various accounting topics. The course is given in collaboration between Stockholm School of Economics (SSE), Stockholm University School of Business (SU) and Uppsala University (UU). The seminars are based on active student participation and on student presentations.

The name of the course, Accounting Classics, indicates that the papers can be perceived as having stood the test of time. However, the definition and choice of what is a “classic” is a debated issue. Here, classic indicates either often cited work or work that has been particularly influential in specific areas. Furthermore, classics in accounting research tend not to stand the test of time if we compare e.g. to literature. Nevertheless, the Accounting Classics become obligatory points of reference in terms of framing an accounting field. Therefore, this course offers insights into literature that we could expect to see discussed in the future as well. During the course’s first three seminars the students will read and discuss different sets of papers and probe into questions like:

  • What are the “take aways” from the paper/book?
  • What has (not) made this paper worthy of being labelled a classic?
  • What empirical corpus is mobilized? How does this compare to your project?
  • What method(s) are being applied?
  • How do these readings compare with each other? Are they in conflict with other dominating descriptions of accounting?
  • How does the literature stand the test of time?
  • What, if anything, can be a resource for your own project?

During the last session the students will present a literature review. The analysis should rely on (some of the) literature discussed in the first three seminars.

2. Learning outcomes

  • To give a broad insight into influential readings in accounting research.
  • To broaden the view of accounting research so that it is possible to engage in several discourses in accounting.
  • To stimulate the participants to engage with readings that have been influential.
  • To introduce competing theoretical and methodological frameworks/approaches.
  • To encourage the use of interpretive approaches to accounting research.

 

  • To show how previous Scandinavian PhD-thesis have been composed in terms of accounting classics.
  • To develop the participants’ transferable skills to international standards.

3. Practicalities:

The course conductors are faculty from SSE, SU and UU and the venues for the four two-day

seminars will change accordingly.

Seminar

Topic Date time and room (all 2016) Venue* Tutors (prel)
Seminar 1 Introduction, Auditing, Reporting and Accounting and representation Date: 31/3

Time: 13.00-17.00

Room: 2:229

Date: 1/4

Time: 9.00-12.00

Room: 2:231

Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Kräftiket Prof. Bino Catasús
Seminar

2:

Strategy and management control, Behavioural Accounting and Management control Date: 27/4

Time: 10.00-17.00 Room: Faculty Club (H429)

Date: 28/4

Time: 09.00-12.00

Room: E203

Department of Business Administration, Uppsala University, Ekonomikum Prof. Fredrik Nilsson
Seminar

3:

Accounting History, Accounting Regulation, Towards an extended view on management control, quantitative auditing research Date: 17/5

Time: 13.00-17.00

Room: TBD

Date 18/5

Time: 9.00-12.00

Room:TBD

Stockholm
School of
Economics
Prof. Henrik Nilsson

Prof. Johnny
Lind

Prof. Walter Sxhuster

Seminar

4:

Presentation of literature
review
Date: 30/5

Time: 09.00-12.00

Room: 2:239

Date: 31/5

Time: 09.00-12.00

Room: 2:231

Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Kräftiket

Prof. Bino Catasús Prof. Fredrik Nilsson

 

*Specifics (e.g. which address or which room) will be sent directly to the admitted students.

4. Application:

The application should be sent to Linnea Shore ls@sbs.su.se before February 15, 2015. Please note that the number of students that can attend the course is limited and that students of the PhD School of Accounting in Sweden (FIRE) are prioritized in the admission. The application should include: Name, affiliation, (Preliminary) Project title, What year you started as a PhD.

Please note that it is possible for PhD-students admitted to Swedish Universities to apply for grants for travel and accommodation by contacting Svenska Revisionsakademin (www.revisionsakademin.se).

5. Deliverables:

  • The students are expected to be present during all seminars.
  • It is expected that the students have read the literature for the seminar before the seminar and that the students are ready to discuss and even present various aspects of the text.
  • Participants will be required to submit a written piece of work to each seminar.
    • To the first three seminars (including the first one) the students are expected to write comments on the papers for the seminar. This paper should not exceed 2000 words. A possible way to write this short review is to relate to the questions above.
    • To the final seminar the students are expected to submit a literature review of a (for them) relevant stream of accounting literature. The review should be no longer than 3000 words. The students should also be ready to present the paper at the last seminar.
    • To the final seminar, the students are expected to read each other’s reviews and to give comments at the seminar.
    • Please note that there may be more specified instructions sent out to the participants during the course

 

Literature (prel):

Seminar 1: Interdisciplinary accounting

Auditing

Anderson-Gough, F., C. Grey, et al. (2005). “Helping them to forget”: the organizational

embedding of gender relations in public audit firms.” Accounting, organizations and society 30(5): 469-490.

Pentland, B. T. (1993). “Getting comfortable with the numbers: auditing and the micro-

production of macro-order.” Accounting, organizations and society 18(7): 605-620. Power, M. (1996). “Making things auditable.” Accounting, organizations and society 21(2): 289-

315.

Accounting representation

Chua, W. F. (1995). “Experts, networks and inscriptions in the fabrication of accounting images: a story of the representation of three public hospitals.” Accounting, organizations and

society 20(2): 111-145.

Espeland, W. N. and M. L. Stevens (1998). “Commensuration as a social process.” Annual review of sociology: 313-343. Hines, R. D. (1988). “Financial accounting: in communicating reality, we construct reality.” Accounting, organizations and society 13(3): 251-261.

Reporting

Cooper, S. M. and D. L. Owen (2007). “Corporate social reporting and stakeholder accountability: The missing link.” Accounting, organizations and society 32(7): 649-667.

Young, Joni J. (2006). “Making up users.” Accounting, Organizations and Society 31(6): 579-600. Shapiro, B. P. (1997). “Objectivity, relativism, and truth in external financial reporting: What’s

really at stake in the disputes?” Accounting, organizations and society 22(2): 165-185

 

Seminar 2:

Strategy and management control

Govindarajan V. (1988). “A Contingency Approach to Strategy Implementation at the Business Unit Level: Integrating Administrative Mechanisms with Strategy.” Academy of Management Journal 31: 828-853.

Roberts J. (1990). “Strategy and Accounting in a U.K. Conglomerate.” Accounting, Organizations and Society 15: 107-126.

Simons R. (1994). “How Top Managers Use Control Systems as Levers of Strategic Renewal.” Strategic Management Journal 15: 169-189.

Behavioural accounting

Hopwood AG. (1972). “An Empirical Study of the Role of Accounting Data in Performance

Evaluation.” Journal of Accounting Research 10: 156-182.

Otley DT. (1978). “Budget Use and Managerial Performance.” Journal of Accounting Research 16:

122-149

Jönsson S. and Grönlund A. (1988). “Life with a Sub-contractor: New Technology and

Management Accounting.” Accounting, Organizations and Society 13: 512-532.

Management control

Hedberg B. and Jönsson S. (1978). “Designing Semi-confusing Information Systems for

Organizations in Changing Environments.” Accounting, Organizations and Society 3: 47-64. Hopwood AG. (1983). “On Trying to Study Accounting in the Contexts in which it Operates.”

Accounting, Organizations and Society 8: 287-305.

Scapens, R. W. (2006). “Understanding management accounting practices: A personal journey.” The British Accounting Review, 38: 1-30.

 

Seminar 3:

Accounting History

Zeff, S. (1978). “The Rise of Economic Consequences, Stanford Lectures in Accounting”. (18 p. distributed to participants)

Zeff, S. (1999). “The Evolution of the Conceptual Framework for Business Enterprises in the United States. Accounting Historians Journal 26 (2): 89-131.

Accounting Regulation

Watts, R. and Zimmerman, J (1978). “Towards a Positive Theory of the Determination of

Accounting Standards”. The Accounting Review 53 (1): 112-134.

Chambers, R (1993). “Positive Accounting Theory and the PA Cult”. Abacus 29 (1): 1-26.

Quantitative auditing research

Gul, Ferdinand A., Donghui Wu, and Zhifeng Yang. “Do individual auditors affect audit quality?

Evidence from archival data.” The Accounting Review 88.6 (2013): 1993-2023.

Craswell, Allen T., Jere R. Francis, and Stephen L. Taylor. “Auditor brand name reputations and

industry specializations.” Journal of accounting and economics 20.3 (1995): 297-322. Teoh, Siew Hong, and T. J. Wong. “Perceived auditor quality and the earnings response

coefficient.” Accounting Review (1993): 346-366.

Extended view on management control

Otley, D. (1994). Management control in contemporary organizations: towards a wider

framework, Management Accounting Research, 5, 289-299.

Tomkins, C. (2001). Interdependencies, trust, and information in relationships, alliances and

networks, Accounting, Organizations and Society, 161-191.

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Feb 10 2015

Research in Auditing 23.03.2015 – 08.05.2015

Published by under PhD Courses

Time: Spring 2015 in two blocks (2 + 3 days) totaling 34 hours lectures and paper discussions. The first block will be held on Monday 23.03. – Tuesday 24.03.2015 by professor William F. Messier (University of Nevada, Las Vegas).

Place: University of Vaasa, Vaasa

Learning goal and objectives: The course introduces students to the primary areas of research in auditing. It covers behavioral research as well as empirical archival research. The objectives of the course are to (i) provide an overview of primary research areas in auditing, (ii) make students familiar with some main research methodologies and statistical methods in auditing, (iii) to improve student’s ability to critically evaluate the quality of research in auditing and to (iv) introduce students to the publication process.

The lectures (a total of 34 hours) will be given in two blocks:

Professor William F. Messier (University of Nevada, Lee Business School) will have two days of lectures:

a. They will be held in the second half of March (week 12 or 13, the days will be specified as soon as possible)

b. Preparation for these lectures will include reading assignments and written assignments. Therefore it is necessary to make sure that the participants can dedicate about 3-5 days before the classes for preparation.

Professor Marleen Willekens (KU Leuven) will have three days of lectures:

a. Wed May 6th – Fri May 8th , closer details will be communicated to the participants.

b. Preparation for these lectures will include reading assignments and written assignments. Therefore it is necessary to make sure that the participants can dedicate about 3-5 days before the classes for preparation.

Course requirements: The course requires a Master’s level knowledge in accounting as well as familiarity with commonly used statistical methods in accounting/auditing. A Master’s / PhD level course in econometrics is recommended.

Target group: Doctoral students in Accounting and related disciplines

Course Language: English

ECTS: 6 Credits

Number of students: 25. Accounting PhD students have priority, but the course is also open for KATAJA-, FDPE-, and foreign doctoral students given that there is space in the course.

The application should contain your CV and a short separate document with at least the following information:

Name *

Email *

University *

Department *

Discipline *

Year when officially accepted as doctoral student *

Research area/ Subject of thesis *

Phase of doctoral studies *

Motives for participating in the course *

Applications are sent directly kim.ittonen@hanken.fi and application deadline will be announced later on the Kataja web page.

Course work and evaluation: Paper presentations and discussions; term paper (scale 1 – 5).

Required readings: The list of papers will be provided by the instructors

Instructors:

Professor William F. Messier (University of Nevada, Lee Business School) http://business.unlv.edu/people/William-Messier/

Professor Marleen Willekens (KU Leuven) http://www.econ.kuleuven.be/feb/medewerker/Userpage.aspx?PID=297

Course Coordinator and contact person: Kim Ittonen, Hanken School of Economics

 

http://www.kataja.eu/courses/course-descriptions/courses-2015/37-courses/courses-2016/general-courses/112-research-in-auditing-01-03-2015-08-05-2015

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Apr 22 2014

Advanced Financial Statement Analysis 13.08 – 15.08.2014

Published by under PhD Courses

Course Description: This course covers selected topics in empirical research in financial analysis. We aim at understanding how accounting research questions are addressed using empirical-archival methods. To obtain a broad understanding of empirical research in financial analysis, it is necessary to read thoroughly, and understand the required readings. For each paper, you should be able to answer three questions: (1) what is the research question? (2) How is it answered, i.e., what is the approach, what is the setting? (3) What answer is reached? We will use these questions in our discussions. You need to come prepared to discuss the topics in class. While I do not expect you to find critical flaws in every paper, I expect you to try by reading these papers with skepticism. Your appreciation for the research will be that much greater

Learning outcomes: After active participation in the course, students will have a thorough understanding of research results and key techniques used in empirical archival capital market based accounting research. This will include both the classical foundational studies and the research frontier as it is today.

Course requirements: Active participation in a class, pre-course preparation and an assignment.

 Active participation in a class and the pre-course preparation:

 The papers that will be discussed in class are assigned to class participants (about three papers per person). Please read your assigned paper very carefully and prepare a summary of one page along the following sub-topics:

Assignment

Students continue working on the assigned paper to complete an assignment of about 10 pages. The final assignment contains the same sub-topics as the one page summary required for the pre-course preparation.

Target group:Ph.D. Students in Accounting

Time: Wednesday, Aug 13 – Friday, Aug 15, 2014

Place: Oulu Business School, University of Oulu.

Course Language: English

ECTS: 5 Credits

Number of students: 25

Course work and evaluation: The course grade is based on a closed-book final exam of up to 3 hours (75%) and class participation (25%).

Required readings: A collection of articles, summaries, and power point slides to be discussed in class.

Instructor: Professor Per Olsson, Duke University ( per.olsson@duke.edu)

Course coordinator and contact person: Prof. Juha-Pekka Kallunki, University of Oulu ( juha-pekka.kallunki@oulu.fi)

 Application deadline: May 20, 2014

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Mar 31 2014

Research Methodology in Auditing Regulation and Corporate Governance

Published by under PhD Courses

This course considers five current topics in auditing regulation: Costs and benefits of requiring engagement partner signaures on audit reports. Market reaction to the regulator’s inability to conduct foreign inspections, Social Ties, audit quality, and audit fees, Audit quality and fee gender effects in Sweden, and Investor reaction to proposed mandatory audit firm rotation.

Place: NHH
Time: May 5th – May 9th, 2014 09:15 – 16:00

To register for the course, please send an email to: heidi.wageningen@nhh.no

Course responsible

Prof. Joseph Carcello, University of Tennessee
Prof. Iris Stuart, NHH

Learning outcomes:

This course considers five current topics in auditing regulation: Costs and benefits of requiring engagement partner signatures on audit reports, Market reaction to the regulator’s inability to do conduct foreign inspections, Social Ties, audit quality, and audit fees, Audit quality and fee gender effects in Sweden, and Investor reaction to proposed mandatory audit firm rotation.

Knowledge – The candidate…

  • is in the forefront of knowledge within research related to audit regulation and masters the research methods used in this research,
  • can contribute to the development of new knowledge in the field

Skills – The candidate…

  • can carry out research of a high international standard

Competence – The candidate…

  • can identify new relevant ethical issues and carry out his/her research with scholarly integrity
  • can communicate research and development work through recognized Norwegian and international channels

Topics

audit regulation and corporate governance

Prerequisites

PhD status

Literature

Journal articles

Teaching

Discussion, Class presentation of research projects

Requirements for course approval

Exam

presentation of research proposal on last day of class

Grading: Pass / fail.

Computer tools

none

REG519NFB – Research Methodology in Auditing Regulation and Corporate Governance

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Feb 21 2013

Audit Judgment Research

Published by under PhD Courses

Audit Judgment Research

Norwegian School of Economics NHH

March 4-8, 2013

Steve Asare, Iris Stuart

Iris.stuart@nhh.no

 

Purpose:

This seminar provides a survey of audit judgment research, with a special emphasis on current trends and promising avenues for future studies. The primary difference between auditor judgment research and other areas (e.g., empirical financial accounting or analytical management accounting) pertains to its behavioral assumptions. Whereas other areas typically assume extreme forms of rationality (e.g., expected utility maximization), audit judgment accounting research assumes that human behavior reflects the implications of bounded rationality. Also, instead of assuming that human behavior is motivated by narrow self-interest only, some judgment studies examine whether broader motives (e.g., fairness and other social factors) are important as well. Another difference is that most audit judgment research employs an experimental method. Experimentation has several advantages including control over independent variables and dependent measures of theoretical interest. But, it also has disadvantages including uncertain external validity (i.e., generalizability from laboratory settings to natural field settings). Our survey course includes many experimental studies, but will also cover some field-based behavioral research that addresses concerns about external validity.

 

Teaching and learning methods:

The seminar will adopt a discussion format, not a lecture format. All seminar participants are expected to read the assignments in advance and actively join in the discussion.  Each session will include 4 primary research articles and often some background reading(s).  I have also assigned some general background readings that will not be covered in class but which I expect you to read.

Student participants are asked to write and present a research paper/proposal on a audit judgment issue. I will work individually with each student to identify the issue and guide the development of the project. The last day of class is reserved for the students’ presentation of their work.

 

Preparation for the course:

Prior to the start of the course, each participant should prepare a one page summary of their research agenda (planned or in process). The summary should identify 1) the nature (purpose and subject area) of the research; 2) the research method(s) planned or already adopted; 3) anticipated limitations or difficulties of conducting the research; and 4) progress, if any, to date. Participants should also include a short paragraph indicating what they consider to be the most important learning outcome(s) of attending this course.


Learning outcomes:

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

  • • Understand how different audit judgment research methods can and should be used to address different accounting issues.
  • • Critique existing audit judgment research papers.
  • • Recognize key issues in gathering, presenting, and analyzing data.
    • • Assess when experimentation is an appropriate way to address an accounting research question, and why.
    • • Differentiate between conceptual and operational accounting research questions.
    • • Apply techniques to getting published in accounting journals.
    • • Develop research projects within the field.

Content:

The course will address a range of audit judgment research subjects including:

  • • Determinants of Auditors’ Performance.
  • • The Audit Process
  • • The Review Process
  • • Disclosure
  • • Accountability and Performance
  • • Accounting Fraud

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH CLASS SESSION

During each session we will discuss the four primary research articles.  Each student must read all 4 articles carefully.  For each article, one student will serve as both an advocate and a critic, with 15 minutes dedicated to each role.  Approximately 45 minutes of class time will be dedicated to each paper as follows.

Student acts as advocate (describes contribution(s) and strengths of the paper)…..15 min.

Student acts as critic (describes problems and weaknesses of the paper)…………..15 min.

General class discussion………………………………………………………………………………..15 min.

Advocate role (15 minutes):  Your goal as advocate is not merely to summarize the article but to explain the study’s contribution and why that contribution is important to accounting theory and/or practice.  That is, explain clearly what we learn from the study and why this is important.  In addition, describe the strengths of the study, explaining clearly why you believe items you describe make the study better.

Critic role (15 minutes):  Your goal as critic should be to point out the study’s limitations (but don’t limit yourself to the limitations listed in the paper).  Be critical, but constructive.  For each problem you identify, you should explain clearly:

1) why it is a problem.

2) how it affects the interpretation of the study’s results.

3) how the problem might have been avoided or overcome, keeping in mind the cost-benefit tradeoffs that must be made in all experiments.

The intent of having you act as both the advocate and critic of the paper is to sharpen your skills as an author and a reviewer or editor when you are pointing out problems with the paper.  This is not to say that authors never acknowledge problems with their papers or that reviewers and editors only point out problems with papers.  In fact, since most of the papers we will cover have been published, the reviewers and editor must have believed the paper made a contribution despite any problems they may have noted.  If you keep this in mind, you will be able to distinguish between a limitation that is fatal and those that can coexist with the paper’s contributions.

 

Presentation Outlines

For each of your presentations you should prepare and distribute an outline to all participants one day before the presentation. This way, at the end of the semester, each of us will have an outline of the contributions and limitations of each assigned article.

 

Article Summary Sheets

You must also complete and turn in an Article Summary Sheet (see attachment) for each of the 4 primary articles each day (i.e., not just if you are presenting the article).  The intent of the Article Summary Sheet is to have you to identify the conceptual and operational research question addressed in each article, as well as suggesting two comments or questions you can raise during the general discussion time. This must be turned in via email no later than the Monday before the class.

Article Summary Sheet

 

Your name

 

Article reference (e.g., Koonce, Nelson, and Wright, 2012)

 

Please fill out the boxes in the following diagram to indicate what you perceive are the study’s primary conceptual and operational research questions.

 

 

Does X                     lead to                               Y?

Independent construct(s):

Dependent construct(s):

 

 

 

 

 

Conceptual

Question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Independent variable(s):

Dependent variable(s):

 

 

 

 

 

Operational

Question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please indicate two questions or comments from this study that you would like to discuss:

 

 

 

 

 

Class Schedule

 

Day 1:  Introduction

 

Required

 

 

Required

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

  • Bonner, Sarah E., (2008), Judgment and Decision Making in Accounting, Pearson Prentice Hall, Chapters 1 and 2

 

  • Libby, Bloomfield, and Nelson (2002), p. 775-780. “Experimental Research in Financial Accounting.” Accounting, Organizations and Society.

 

  • Nelson and Tan (2005), p. 41-71. “Judgment and Decision Making Research in Auditing: A Task, Person, and Interpersonal Interaction Perspective.” Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 24 (Supplement).

 

  • Peecher and Solomon (2001) p. 193-203. “Theory and Experimentation in Studies of Audit Judgments and Decisions: Avoiding Common Research Traps.” International Journal of Auditing 5(3).

 

  • McDaniel, L. S., and J. R. M. Hand. 1996. The value of experimental methods for practice-relevant research. Contemporary Accounting Research 13 (Spring): 339–351.

 

 

 

Day 2:  Internal Control Disclosures

 

Background

 

 

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

  • Asare, Stephen Kwaku, Fitzgerald, Brian C., Graham, Lynford E., Joe, Jennifer, Negangard, Eric Michael and Wolfe, Christopher J., Auditors’ Internal Control Over Financial Reporting Decisions: Analysis, Synthesis, and Research Directions (April 1, 2012). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2032822 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2032822.

 

  • Earley, C., Hoffman, V. and J. Joe. 2008. Reducing management’s influence on auditors’ judgments: An experimental investigation of SOX 404 assessments. The Accounting Review 83 (6): 1461–1485.

  • Rose, J., Norman, C., and Rose, A. 2010. Perceptions of Investment Risk Associated with Material Control Weakness Pervasiveness and Disclosure Detail. The Accounting Review, Vol. 85, No. 5: 1787-1807.
  • Wolfe, C., Mauldin, E. , and M. Diaz. 2009. Concede or deny: Do management persuasion tactics affect auditor evaluation of internal control deviations? The Accounting Review 84, (6): 2013–2037.

 

·         Asare, S. and A. Wright (2011). The Effect of Type of Internal Control Report on Users’ Confidence in the Accompanying Financial Statement Audit Report. Contemporary Accounting Research (September): 1-24

 

 

 

Day 3:  Evaluating Financial Misreporting

 

Required

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

  • Auditors’ Use of Brainstorming in the Consideration of Fraud: Reports from the Field. Joseph F. Brazel et al., The Accounting Review 85, 1273 (2010)

 

  • A Field Experiment Comparing the Outcomes of Three Fraud Brainstorming Procedures: Nominal Group, Round Robin, and Open Discussion. James E. Hunton et al., The Accounting Review 85, 911 (2010).

 

  • Hoffman, V. B., and M. F. Zimbelman. 2009. Do Strategic Reasoning and Brainstorming Help Auditors Change Their Standard Audit Procedures in Response to Fraud Risk? The Accounting Review 84 (3): 811–837.

 

  • Brazel, J., Jones, K., and M. Zimbelman Using nonfinancial measures to assess fraud risk. JAR (December 2009):1135-1166

 

 

 

Day 4: Improving Decisions with more Heads

 

 

Background:

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

  • Rich, J.S., I. Solomon, and K.T. Trotman. (1997). The Audit Review Process: A Characterization from the Persuasion Perspective. Accounting, Organizations and Society. 22(5): 481-505.

 

  • Agoglia, C.P., T. Kida, and D.M. Hanno. (2003). The Effects of Alternative Justification Memos on the Judgments of Audit Reviewees and Reviewers. Journal of Accounting Research. 41(1): 33-46.

 

  • Rich, J.S. (2004). Reviewers’ Responses to Expectations about the Client and the Preparer. The Accounting Review. 79(2): 497-517.

 

  • Brazel, J.F., C.P. Agoglia, and R.C. Hatfield. (2004). Electronic versus Face-to-Face Review: The Effects of Alternative Forms of Review on Auditors’ Performance. The Accounting Review. 79(4): 949-966.

 

  • Lambert, T. and Agoglia, C. 2011. Closing the Loop: Review process factors affecting audit staff follow-through. Journal of Accounting Research 2011

 

 

 

 

Day 5: Judging Risk

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

 

 

Required

 

 

Required

 

 

 

Required

·         SEC Market Risk Disclosures: Implications for Judgment and Decision Making, Journal article by Leslie Hodder, Lisa Koonce, Mary Lea Mcanally; Accounting Horizons, Vol. 15, 2001

 

  • Investor Reaction to Derivative Use: Experimental Evidence (L. Koonce, M. Lipe, and M. McAnally), Review of Accounting Studies. 2008: 571-597

 

  • Judging the Risk of Financial Instruments: Problems and Potential Remedies (L. Koonce, M. Lipe, and M. McAnally), The Accounting Review, July 2005, pp. 871-895.

 

  • How Do Investors Judge the Risk of Financial and Derivative Instruments? (L. Koonce, M. McAnally, and M. Mercer), The Accounting Review, January 2005, pp. 221-241.
  • Judging the Relevance of Fair Value for Financial Instruments. ( Lisa Koonce, Karen K. Nelson, and Catherine Shakespeare) TAR Nov 2011

 

 

 

PAPER PRESENTATIONS

 

 

Optional Readings for individuals interested in examining this topic in more detail

 

Optional Readings: Information Location

 

 

 

 

  • Hirst, D. E., and P. E. Hopkins. “Comprehensive Income Reporting and Analysts’ Valuation Judgments.” Journal of Accounting Research 36 (Supplement) (1998): 47-75.

 

  • Hirst, D.E, P.E. Hopkins, and J.M. Whalen. “Fair Values, Performance Reporting, and Bank Analysts’ Risk and Valuation Judgments.” The Accounting Review 79 (2) (2004): 453-472.

 

  • Hopkins, P.E., R.W. Houston, and M.F. Peters. “Purchase, Pooling, and Equity Analysts’ Valuation Judgments.” The Accounting Review 75 (3) (2000): 257-281.

  • Maines, L. A., and L. S. McDaniel. “Effects of Comprehensive-Income Characteristics on Nonprofessional Investors’ Judgments: The Role of Financial-Statement Presentation Format.” The Accounting Review 75(2) (2000): 179-207

 

 

Optional Readings: Judging Risk

 

   

  • Investor Reaction to Derivative Use: Experimental Evidence (L. Koonce, M. Lipe, and M. McAnally), Review of Accounting Studies. 2008: 571-597

 

  • Judging the Risk of Financial Instruments: Problems and Potential Remedies (L. Koonce, M. Lipe, and M. McAnally), The Accounting Review, July 2005, pp. 871-895.

 

  • How Do Investors Judge the Risk of Financial and Derivative Instruments? (L. Koonce, M. McAnally, and M. Mercer), The Accounting Review, January 2005, pp. 221-241.
  • Judging the Relevance of Fair Value for Financial Instruments. ( Lisa Koonce, Karen K. Nelson, and Catherine Shakespeare) The Accounting Review, Nov 2011

 

 

 

 

 

Optional Readings: Improving Decisions with more Heads

 

 

Background:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primary:

 

  • Rich, J.S., I. Solomon, and K.T. Trotman. (1997). The Audit Review Process: A Characterization from the Persuasion Perspective. Accounting, Organizations and Society. 22(5): 481-505.

 

  • Agoglia, C.P., T. Kida, and D.M. Hanno. (2003). The Effects of Alternative Justification Memos on the Judgments of Audit Reviewees and Reviewers. Journal of Accounting Research. 41(1): 33-46.

 

  • Rich, J.S. (2004). Reviewers’ Responses to Expectations about the Client and the Preparer. The Accounting Review. 79(2): 497-517.

 

  • Brazel, J.F., C.P. Agoglia, and R.C. Hatfield. (2004). Electronic versus Face-to-Face Review: The Effects of Alternative Forms of Review on Auditors’ Performance. The Accounting Review. 79(4): 949-966.

 

  • Lambert, T. and Agoglia, C. 2011. Closing the Loop: Review process factors affecting audit staff follow-through. JAR 2011

 

 

Optional Readings: Negotiations in Accounting

 

 

 

 

  • Gibbins, M., S. Salterio, and A. Webb. 2001. Evidence about auditor-client management negotiation concerning client’s financial reporting. JAR 39(3):535-563.

 

·         Ng and Tan. 2003. Effects of Authoritative Guidance Availability and Audit Committee Effectiveness on Auditors’ Judgments in an Auditor-Client Negotiation Context, TAR 801 of 801-818

 

  • Sanchez, M., C. Agoglia and R. Hatfield. 2007. The effect of auditors’ use of a reciprocity based strategy on auditor-client negotiations. AR 82(2).

 

  • Hatfield et al. The Effect of Magnitude of Audit Difference and Prior Client Concessions on Negotiations of Proposed Adjustments. TAR 2010: 1647-1668

 

  • Perreault, S. and T. Kida. The relative effectiveness of persuasion tactics in auditor-client negotiations. Working Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Optional Readings: Motivated Reasoning 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background:

  • Kunda, Z. “The Case for Motivated Reasoning.” Psychological Bulletin 108 (November 1990): 480–98.

Research articles:

  • Thayer, J. “Determinants of Investors’ Information Acquisition: Credibility and Confirmation.” The Accounting Review 86 (January 2011): 1-22.

 

  • Hales, J., X. J. Kuang, & S. Venkataraman. “Who Believes the Hype? An Experimental Examination of  How Language Affects Investor Judgments.” Journal of Accounting Research 49 (March 2011): 223–255.

 

  • Han, J. and Tan H. 2010. Investors’ Reactions to Management Earnings Guidance: The Joint Effect of Investment Position, News Valence, and Guidance Form. JAR (March): 81-104.

 

  • HALES, J. “Directional Preferences, Information Processing, and Investors’ Forecasts of Earnings.” Journal of Accounting Research 45 (2007): 607–28.

 

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Aug 17 2012

Doctoral Seminar in Accounting and Corporate Governance Research

Published by under PhD Courses

Autumn 2012 at Jönköping International Business School, quarter speed

Course credits:

7.5 ECTS credits

Education Cycle:

Third cycle, doctoral program course

Course managers/examiners:

Associate Professor Petra Inwinkl

Course language:

English

Prerequisites:
Admitted as a doctoral student in Business Administration or Law

Purpose and objectives:

The primary objective of the course is to provide participants to some major themes and methodologies of contemporary empirical financial accounting and corporate governance research. We will consider the theoretical basis and research methods of key papers drawn from the academic accounting and corporate governance literature to enable doctoral students to develop the skills to conduct their own research. Achievement of this objective will also necessitate that students develop an appreciation of the research tools necessary to become productive scholars.

Course content:

The contents of this course include

  • (i)  business, financial, political and legal issues affecting systems by which corporations are directed and controlled,
  • (ii)  a comparative and interdisciplinary approach,
  • (iii)  the nature of the corporation, the basic theory of the firm, the internal and external
    architecture of corporate governance,
  • (iv)  the role of regulatory authorities, models of corporate governance, principal-agent theory
    within the corporate context,
  • (v)  the corporate culture, corruption, management and board compensation, conceptions of
    social responsibility, and capital market development and international cross-listing of
    shares,
  • (vi)  the reforms and new standards which were set in the wake of corporate scandals.

 

Intended learning outcomes:

After completing the course the student should be able to:

Knowledge and understanding

  1. Knowaboutthemajorthemesandmethodologiesofcontemporaryempiricalfinancial accounting and corporate governance research
  2. Understand the theoretical foundation drawn from the academic literature
  3. Know the research methods drawn from the academic literature
  4. Describethelimitationsofcorporategovernanceresearch

Skills and abilities

  1. Usekeypaperstoexplainofeachpaperitsresearchobjective,motivation,design, method and contribution
  2. Transformlearnedoutcomesintoownpublicationidea
  3. Write own research paper related on a subject to accounting and corporate governance
    research

Judgement and approach

8. Assessthediscussionpaperresultsandunderstandthelimitationsofthevariousmethods

 

Course/classes methodology

Seminars (about 18), and homework assignments (3).

  1. Attendance: This course is taught as a seminar. Classroom participation is a vital part of the course. For participation to be meaningful, students should read assigned material before coming to class. 
  2. Discussion paper: Each student will be required to submit short discussion papers of no more than 4 double-spaced pages. Each paper should detail with the paper’s research objective, the problem/motivation, the design and method, and the contribution.
  3. Seminar paper: Each student will be required to complete a seminar paper of 10 double- spaced pages on a subject related to accounting and corporate governance research and approved by the instructor.

 

Examination

Grading: Final grade for the seminar will consist of three factors:
1. 50% of the final grade will be determined by the grade on the seminar paper.
2. 25% of the final grade will be determined by the quality of student participation. 3. 25% of the final grade will be determined by the grade on the discussion papers.

Seminar paper (50%) at the end of the course, which covers ILO (6) and (7). Student participation (25%) during the course, which covers ILOs (1)-(3). Discussion papers (25%) during the course, which covers ILOs (4)-(5).

Course evaluation

A course evaluation will be conducted at the end of the course.

Schedule

Course start: August 31, 2012
Register for the course by contacting Petra Inwinkl (JIBS, Box 1026, 551 11 Jönköping/phone. 036-101818 e-mail Petra.Inwinkl@jibs.hj.se).

Course Literature

Packet of the reading materials will be available to students on PING PONG.

 

Successful Research

Classes

Preliminary reading list

  1. James A. Ohlson 2011. On Successful Research. European Accounting Review vol. 20, No. 1, 2011: 7-8.
  2. Wai Fong Chua 2011. In Search of “Successful” Accounting Research. European Accounting Review vol. 20, No. 1, 2011: 27-39.
  3. Christensen John 2011. Good Analytical Research. European Accounting Review vol. 20, No. 1, 2011: 41-51.
  4. Czarniawska Barbara 2011. Successful Research: In Whose Eyes? European Accounting Review vol. 20, No. 1, 2011: 53-55.
  5. Searcy, D.L. and J.T. Mentzer. 2003. A framework for conducting and evaluating research. Journal of Accounting Literature 22: 130-167.
  6. Kinney, W.R. Jr. 1986. Empirical accounting research design for Ph.D. students. The Accounting Review 61 (2) (April): 338-350. 
  7. 7. Demski, J.S. and J.L. Zimmerman. 2000. On “research vs. teaching”: A long-term perspective. Accounting Horizons 14 (3) (September): 343-352.

 

Theories

  1. Jensen, M.C. and W.H. Meckling. 1976. Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure. Journal of Financial Economics 3 (4)
    (October): 305-360.
  2. Schleifer, A. & R.W. Vishny (1997). A Survey of Corporate Governance. Journal of Finance, LII (2), June, pp. 737-783.
  3. Brown, Verhoeven and Beeks “Corporate governance, accounting and finance: a review (2010)

Accounting and Governance Systems

  1. Arnold B., & P. de Lange P. (2004). Enron: An examination of agency problems. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Volume 15, Issue 6-7, pp. 751-765.
  2. Ahmed, Duellman, Evidence on the role of accounting conservatism in monitoring managers investment decisions, 2011, Accounting and Finances
  3. Bebchuk, L.A. & M.J. Roe (1999). A Theory of Path Dependence in Corporate Governance and Ownership. Columbia Law School: The Center for Law and Economic Studies, Working Paper No. 131.

Financial Accounting Numbers in Corporate Governance Research

  1. Bushman, R. et al. (2004). Financial accounting information, organizational complexity and corporate governance systems. Journal of Accounting and Economics, Vol.37, Issue 2, pp.167-201.
  2. Armstrong, Guay, Weber; The role of information and financial reporting in corporate governance and debt contracting, 2010, The Journal of Accounting and Economics
  3. Brickley, Zimmerman, Corporate governance myths: comments on Armstrong, Guay and Weber; 2010; Journal of Accounting and Econometrics
  4. Coffee, J. (2005). A Theory of Corporate Scandals: Why the USA and Europe Differ. Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Volume 21, No. 2, pp. 198-211.
  5. Melis, A. (2004). Corporate Governance Failures. To What Extent is Parmalat a particularly Italian Case? Corporate Governance: An International Review, Volume 13, No. 4, pp. 478- 488.
  6. 6. Chhaochharia, V. & Y. Grinstein (2007). Corporate governance and firm value. The impact of the 2002 governance rules. The Journal of Finance, Vol.62, No.4, pp.1789-1825.

Boards and Executive Compensation

  1. Adams, Hermalin and Weisbach; The role of boards of directors in corporate governance: a conceptual framework and survey (2010).
  2. Hillier, D. & P. McColgan (2006). An Analysis of Changes in Board Structure during Corporate Governance Reforms. European Financial Management, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp. 575-607.
  3. Jensen, M. C. & J. B. Warner (1988). The distribution of power among corporate managers and directors. Journal of Financial Economics, 20, pp. 3-24.
  4. Sonnenfeld, J.A. (2002). What makes great boards great. Harvard Business Review, Volume 80, Issue 9, pp. 106-113, 126.
  5. Fahlenbrach Rüdiger, Angie Low, Rene ́ M. Stulz, Why do firms appoint CEOs as outside directors? Journal of Financial Economics, Volume 97, Issue 1, July 2010, Pages 12-32
  6. Cyert R.M., Kang S.-H. & P. Kumar P. (2002). Corporate governance, takeovers, and top- management compensation: theory and evidence. Management Science, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp. 453-469.
  7. Lin, Ying-Fen (2005). Corporate Governance, Leadership Structure and CEO Compensation: evidence from Taiwan. Corporate Governance, Volume 13, Number 6, pp. 824-835.

 

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May 21 2012

IFRS – from origin to improvements

Published by under PhD Courses

Jönköping International Business School – PhD COURSE (F2)

 

Course credits:

7,5 ECTS credits

(1 ECTS =  appr. 5 hrs in class; appr. 20 hrs individual work)

Education Cycle: Third cycle, doctoral program course

The course is given as an accounting research course “IFRS – from origin to improvements”, equivalent to 7.5 ECTS points, is a course offered to research students at Jönköping International Business School as well as to partner universities.

Course examiner/ managers:

Professor Gunnar Rimmel, JIBS (examiner)

Assistant professor Kristina Jonäll, HGU

 

Course language

Language of instruction could be in Swedish and/or in English (depending on international participants).

 

Prerequisites:

To be eligible for the course “IFRS – from origin to improvements” 7.5 higher education credits, the student must be registered as a PhD student at Jönköping International Business School, or at a partner university.

 

Purpose and objectives

This course emphasizes the emergence of a transnational regulatory body and the development of international accounting standards, i.e. the emergence, evolution and concurrent developments of an organization that produces accounting standards. A distinctive consideration will be given to competing regulatory initiatives. This course is not considering an in-depth study of all existing IFRSs but about how transnational standard setting evolved and how the content of international accounting standards emerged.

 

Course content

 

Seminar I – Overview of the Globalisation of Accounting

For Seminar I, participants should read two allotted articles from the course literature list. The assignment, which involves writing and presenting a seminar paper based on the allotted articles, will be distributed to all participants by e-mail directly after signing up for the course. The paper should be of maximum 1500 words. Each participant should also act as discussants, i.e. constructively criticize upon the arguments of the paper of another participant. To be able to do this task properly, the discussant do not only have to read the paper carefully, but also study the literature which the paper is based upon.

 

Seminar II – Competing regulatory initiatives and the role of organizations in transnational standard setting

For Seminar II, participants should write and present a seminar paper on an individually chosen topic from Competing regulatory initiatives and the role of organizations in transnational standard setting – based on two individually chosen articles from the course literature list plus five other articles of relevance for the topic. Otherwise, Seminar II follows the same procedure as Seminar I (see above).

 

Seminar III + IV – Concurrent improvements to accounting standards

As a final assignment, participants have an opportunity to write about concurrent improvements to accounting standards, which they can relate to their own PhD project. Seminar III+IV thereby consist of search for relevant articles inspired by the course literature, read them and prepare an academic paper in which the main arguments and debates within the area are described and commented upon. Expected length of the paper is 20 pages in academic style, where sources are related to each other and analyze weaknesses and potentials identified.

Learning outcomes

After completion of the course the student is expected to be able to:

 

Knowledge and understanding

– be oriented about the emergence of a transnational regulatory body

– describe central streams in the development of international accounting standards and their influence and relevance to postgraduate studies

 

Skills and abilities

– demonstrate how the theoretical foundations of contemporary accounting regulation research have been developed during the past decades

– apply research-based literature to describe and analyze particular aspects of contemporary accounting regulation research related to own postgraduate studies project

 

Judgment and approach

– display a reflective approach to the role of organizations and accounting standard setters in contemporary accounting regulation research

– exemplify different approaches in relation to own postgraduate studies project

 

Course/classes methodology

This is an intensive course of one introduction and three day seminars with individual study required prior to the meetings. The course consists of lectures and seminars. Participants are supposed to read all course literature and participant papers related to seminars and to write short papers that reflect this literature. The course begins with overview lecture, followed in the rest of the seminars by presentations and discussions of the course literature by the participants. At the last seminar, each participant discusses the individual course PM that is related to own PhD-project.

Examination

Examination is recurrent through participation during all tuition and through the fulfillment of individual assignments. Active participation in the form of presentations and discussions at course meetings and a passing grade in the individual course papers.

 

Course evaluation

A course evaluation will be conducted at the end of the course.

  

Course dates, time and location

The course consists of 4 meetings: one introduction and four seminars. The meetings will be held at Jönköping International Business School.

Introduction:              11.00 – 12.00   (Wednesday, 13 June 2012), JIBS

Seminar 1:                   13.00 – 18.00   (Thursday, 14 June 2012), JIBS

Seminar 2:                     9.00 – 15.00   (Thursday, 14 June 2012), JIBS

Seminar 3:                   13.00 – 18.00   (Monday, 27 August 2012), JIBS

Seminar 4:                     9.00 – 15.00   (Tuesday, 28 August 2012), JIBS

 

No tuition fee for PhD students, Course participants are responsible for their own costs of travel and overnight arrangements.

 

The course is limited to 15 participants. 31 May 2012 is the last day for registration.

 

Course literature

Sebastian Botzem (2012) The Politics of Accounting Regulation – organizing transnational standard setting in financial reporting, Eward Elgar, Celtenhamn, UK (ISBN 978 1 84980 177 5)

 

A more detailed article reading list will be made available to course participants in due time.

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May 21 2012

Accounting Communication

Published by under PhD Courses

Jönköping International Business School – PhD COURSE (F2)

 

Course credits:

7,5 ECTS credits

(1 ECTS =  appr. 5 hrs in class; appr. 20 hrs individual work)

Education Cycle: Third cycle, doctoral program course

The course is given as an accounting research course “Accounting Communication”, equivalent to 7.5 ECTS points, is a course offered to research students at Jönköping International Business School, as well as to partner universities.

Course examiner / managers:

Professor Gunnar Rimmel, JIBS (examiner)

 

Assitant professor Kristina, HGU

Associate professor Inga-Lill Johansson, HGU

 

Course language

Language of instruction could be in Swedish and/or in English (depending on international participants).

Prerequisites:

To be eligible for the course Accounting Communication 7.5 higher education credits, the student must be registered as a PhD student at the department of Accounting & Law at Jönköping International Business School, or at a partner university.

 

Purpose and objectives

This course emphasizes the use of accounts in accounting communication, i.e. the production and interpretation of oral and written statements referring to accounting numbers to explain conduct. Special attention will be given to issues of disclosure, agency, accountability and trust.

 

Course content

Seminar I – Overview of Accounting Communication Research

For Seminar I, participants should read two allotted articles from the course literature list. The assignment, which involves writing and presenting a seminar paper based on the allotted articles, will be distributed to all participants by e-mail directly after signing up for the course. The paper should be of maximum 1500 words. Each participant should also act as discussants, i.e. constructively criticize upon the arguments of the paper of another participant. To be able to do this task properly, the discussant do not only have to read the paper carefully, but also study the literature which the paper is based upon.

 

Seminar II – Issues of Disclosure, Agency, Accountability, and Trust

For Seminar II, participants should write and present a seminar paper on an individually chosen topic from any of the fields of disclosure, agency, accountability, or trust – based on two individually chosen articles from the course literature list plus five other articles of relevance for the topic. Otherwise, Seminar II follows the same procedure as Seminar I (see above).

 

Seminar III + IV – Methods in Accounting Communication Studies

As a final assignment, participants have an opportunity to learn about linguistic-, communication- discourse-, and narrative analysis related to own PhD project. Seminar III thereby consist of search for relevant articles inspired by the course literature, read them and prepare an academic paper in which the main arguments and debates within the area are described and commented upon. Expected length of the paper is 20 pages in academic style, where sources are related to each other and analyze weaknesses and potentials identified.

 

Learning outcomes

After completion of the course the student is expected to be able to:

 

Knowledge and understanding

– be oriented about the theoretical foundations of contemporary accounting communication research

– describe central theoretical streams and their influence and relevance to postgraduate studies

 

Skills and abilities

– demonstrate how the theoretical foundations of contemporary accounting communication research have been developed during the past decades

– apply research-based literature to describe and analyze particular aspects of contemporary accounting communication research related to own postgraduate studies project

 

Judgment and approach

– display a reflective approach to the role of theory in contemporary accounting communication research

– exemplify different methodological approaches in relation to own postgraduate studies project

 

Course/classes methodology

This is an intensive course of one introduction and three day seminars with individual study required prior to the meetings. The course consists of lectures and seminars.

Participants are supposed to read all course literature and participant papers related to seminars and to write short papers that reflect this literature. The course begins with overview lecture, followed in the rest of the seminars by presentations and discussions of the course literature by the participants. At the last seminar, each participant discusses the individual course PM that is related to own PhD-project.

 

Examination

Examination is recurrent through active participation during all tuition and through the fulfillment of individual assignments. Active participation in the form of presentations and discussions at course meetings and a passing grade in the individual course papers.

 

Course evaluation

A course evaluation will be conducted at the end of the course.

  

Course dates, time and location

The course consists of 4 meetings: one introduction and four seminars. The first two meetings will be held at Jönköping International Business School. The remaining seminars will be held at the School of Business, Economic and Law at University of Gothenburg.

Introduction:              11.00 – 12.00   (Tuesday, 29 May 2012) JIBS

Seminar 1:                   13.00 – 18.00   (Tuesday, 29 May 2012) JIBS

Seminar 2:                     9.00 – 15.00   (Wednesday, 30 May 2012) JIBS

Seminar 3:                   13.00 – 18.00   (Monday, 13 August 2012) HGU

Seminar 4:                     9.00 – 15.00   (Tuesday, 14 August 2012) HGU

 

No tuition fee for PhD students, Course participants are responsible for their own costs of travel and overnight arrangements.

 

The course is limited to 15 participants.

15 May 2012 is the last day for registration.

 

Course literature

Seminar I – Overview of Accounting Communication Research

  1. Bedford, N. M. & Baladouni, V. (1962) A Communication Theory Approach to Accountancy. The Accounting Review, 37(4), pp. 650-659.
  2. Belkaoui, A. (1978) Linguistic relativity in accounting. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 3 (2), pp. 97-104.
  3. Flamholtz, E. & Cook, E. (1977) Connotative Meaning and its Role in Accounting Change: A Field Study. Accounting Organizations and Society, pp. 115-39.
  4. Miller, P. & O’Leary, T. (1987) Accounting and the construction of the governable person, Accounting Organizations and Society, 12 (3), pp. 235-265.
  5. Lavoie, D. (1987) The accounting of interpretations and the interpretation of accounts: The communicative function of “the language of business”. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 12 (6), pp. 579-604.
  6. Evans, L. (2004) Language, translation and the problem of international accounting communication. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 17 (2), pp. 210-248.
  7. Nørreklit, H., Nørreklit, L., & Mitchell, F. (2010) Towards a paradigmatic foundation for accounting practice, Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 23 (6), pp. 733-758.
  8. Rowbottom, N. & Lymer, A. (2010) Exploring the use and users of narrative reporting in the online annual report. Journal of Applied Accounting, 11 (2), pp. 99-108.
  9. Davison, J. (2011) Barthesian perspectives on accounting communication and visual images of professional accountancy, Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 24 (2), pp. 250-283.
  10. Davison, J. (2011) Paratextual framing of the annual report: Liminal literary conventions and visual devices, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 22 (2), pp. 118-134.

 

Seminar II – Issues of Disclosure, Agency, Accountability, and Trust

  1. Merkl-Davies, D. M., Brennan, N. M. & McLeay, S. J. (2011) Impression management and retrospective sense-making in corporate narratives: A social psychology perspective. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 24 (3), pp. 315-344.
  2. Fauré, B. & Rouleau, L. (2011) The strategic competence of accountants and middle managers in budget making.  Accounting, Organizations & Society, 36 (3), pp. 167-182.
  3. Moore, D. R. J. (2011) Structuration theory: The contribution of Norman Macintosh and its application to emissions trading. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 22 (2), pp. 212-227.
  4. Craig, R. & Amernic, J. (2011) Detecting Linguistic Traces of Destructive Narcissism At-a-Distance in a CEO’s Letter to Shareholders. Journal of Business Ethics, 101 (4), pp. 563-575.
  5. Arvidsson, S. (2010) Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of the Views of Management Teams in Large Companies. Journal of Business Ethics, 96 (3), pp. 339-354.
  6. Kamla, R. & Roberts, C. (2010) The global and the local: Arabian Gulf States and imagery in annual reports. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 23 (4), pp. 449-481.
  7. Aerts, W. & Cormier, D. (2009) Media legitimacy and corporate environmental communication. Accounting, Organizations & Society, 34 (1), pp. 1-27.
  8. Malsch, B. & Gendron, Y. (2009) Mythical representations of trust in auditors and the preservation of social order in the financial community. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 20 (6), pp. 735-750.
  9. Beattie, V., Dhanani, A. & Jones, M. J. (2008) Investigating Presentational Change in U.K. Annual Reports. Journal of Business Communication, 45, pp. 181-222.
  10. Davison, J. (2008) Rhetoric, repetition, reporting and the “dot.com” era: words, pictures, intangibles. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 21 (6), pp. 791-826.
  11. Graham, C. (2008) Fearful asymmetry: The consumption of accounting signs in the Algoma Steel pension bailout. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33, (7-8), pp. 756-782.
  12. Carrington, T. & Johed, G. (2007) The construction of top management as a good steward.  Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 20 (5), pp. 702-728.
  13. Chalos, P. & O’Connor, N. G. (2004) Determinants of the use of various control mechanisms in US-Chinese joint ventures. Accounting, Organizations & Society, 29 (7), pp. 591-608.
  14. Seal, W., Berry, A. & Cullen, J. (2004) Disembedding the supply chain: institutionalized reflexivity and inter-firm accounting. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 29 (1), pp. 73-92.

 

Seminar III + IV – Methods in Accounting Communication Studies

  1. Brennan, Niamh M.; Guillamon-Saorin, Encarna; Pierce, Aileen. Impression management: Developing and illustrating a scheme of analysis for narrative disclosures – a methodological note. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 2009, Vol. 22 Issue 5, pp. 789-832.
  2. Justesen, L. & Mouritsen, J. (2009) The triple visual: Translations between photographs, 3-D visualizations and calculations. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 22 (6), pp. 973-990.
  3. Beattie, V. (2007) Lifting the lid on the use of content analysis to investigate intellectual capital disclosures. Accounting Forum, 31 (2). pp. 129-163.
  4. Baker, C. R. (2006) Epistemological objectivity in financial reporting: Does internet accounting require a new accounting model? Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 19 (5), pp. 663-680.
  5. Beattie, V., McInnes, B. & Fearnley, S. (2004) A methodology for analysing and evaluating narratives in annual reports: a comprehensive descriptive profile and etrics for disclosure quality attributes. Corporate financial communication and voluntary disclosure, 28 (3), pp. 205-236.
  6. Rhianon Edgley, C., Jones, M.J. & Solomon J.F. (2010) Stakeholder inclusivity in social and environmental report assurance Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 23 (4), pp. 532 – 557.

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Apr 10 2012

Intensive PhD Seminar in financial accounting

Published by under PhD Courses

NHH Norges Handelsøyskole

Instructor: Ole-Kristian Hope (CFA, CPA, CMA), Deloitte Professor of Accounting

August 13-17, 2012

 

For applications and enquiries please contact Elisabeth Stiegler at NHH no later than May 28.

 

This intensive course in capital-markets oriented accounting research at NHH offer an introductory survey of empirical research in accounting.

Students should expect to spend the summer preparing for the course. The course content will be finalized and papers assigned approximately eight weeks prior to course start. A detailed course schedule will be made available to registered students at that time. The course will primarily cover recently published articles as well as current working papers. Creativity in research ideas as well as basic research design issues is emphasized.

No prior background in accounting research is expected for this introductory course. However, students are expected to be highly motivated and have a positive attitude. There will be a low tolerance for laziness.

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Feb 23 2012

Contemporary Research in Financial Accounting and Governance

Published by under PhD Courses

Instructor:  Angela Gore, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Accountancy

The George Washington University, U.S.A.

Website Link:  http://business.gwu.edu/faculty/angela_gore.cfm

email:  angela.gore@utu.fi; agore@gwu.edu

 

“A good scientist needs a thick skin and an irrational sense of optimism.”

 

I.  Logistics

Registration:  Students for the course will be selected in the order of registration.  Due to the nature of the course, it is limited to a maximum of 15 participants.  Priority will be given to KATAJA members (e.g. students belonging to GSA).  Registration should be done via e-mail to the Departmental Coordinator Noora Kedonperä (noora.kedonpera@utu.fi).  Deadline for registration is Friday, 2 March 2012.

Venue and time:  Sessions will be held in the Turku School of Economics at the University of Turku, Rehtorinpellonkatu 3, 20500 Turku.  The course comprises two related parts.  The first part will be held from 5 Mar – 9 Mar 2012, and the second part is from 16 Apr – 20 Apr 2012.  For further enquiries, please contact either Angela Gore (angela.gore@utu.fi) or Hannu Schadéwitz (hannu.schadewitz@utu.fi).

The seminar will be held in the following specific locations, from 9-12 each day:

Week 1

Week 2

Mon 5.3 ls 34 Monday 16.4 ls 34
Tues 6.3 OP-Pohjola Tues 17.4 OP-Pohjola
Weds 7.3 OP-Pohjola Weds 18.4 OP-Pohjola
Thurs 8.3 ls 32 Thurs 19.4 ls 32
Fri 9.3 ls 34 Fri 20.4 ls 34

 

II. Course Objectives

This course will provide an introduction to empirical financial accounting research, with a focus on two specific areas:  disclosure and governance-related research.  We’ll study both a variety of recent work in order to introduce you to the latest developments in the area, along with a few ‘classics,’ to help you identify potential research paper/dissertation topics.  We’ll also spend time discussing the elements of good research papers (such as writing a good introduction, and thinking about what referees look for) to help increase your chances of successfully publishing your future work.

 

III. Course Grade

Your course grade will consist of the following:

   
Presentations

35%

Participation

35%

Homework

  30%

   Total grade

100%

 

 

 

Grading will be on a scale of 0-5, 6 ECTS cr units.

 

1. Participation and presentations

The format of this class will primarily be discussion, which means that you’ll be required to do a lot of talking.  We will cover approximately two or three papers during each class meeting.  One student will be responsible for leading the discussion of most papers (and we will allocate the papers at the first class meeting; I will lead the discussion for the papers on the first day for both weeks 1 and 2).  The presenter will orient the discussion around the following questions:

  1. What is the question of interest (main hypothesis or prediction), the motivation (why is this topic interesting and important), and how does it relate to the existing literature?
  2. How do the authors attempt to answer the question of interest, with a focus on methods and research design?
  3. What are the main findings and results?
  4. Did the authors answer the question(s) proposed?  Why or why not?
  5. What improvements would you make to this paper, and/or what questions are left unanswered?

Normally the presentation should last around 30-45 minutes if uninterrupted.  However, interruptions are expected:  the non-presenting students (and myself) are strongly encouraged to ask questions and make comments during the presentations, as they arise.   I do not expect the presenter to know everything about the paper, or to be able to answer all questions (neither can I!).  However, non-presenting students should read the assigned papers thoroughly to the extent that they can explain the paper to a lay person, and make useful comments.  Each non-presenting student should ask at least one question about every paper, and/or provide thoughtful comments.

 

Paper summaries:

To help you be ready for the paper discussions, I ask that you prepare a short summary for each paper.  The summaries should be oriented around the above five questions, and should be sufficiently succinct (on average, one page, but no more than two pages) to allow using them for future reference.  Note that I will not collect these summaries, however, I’ll likely notice if you don’t prepare them.

 

Optional papers:

In addition to the listed papers, which we will discuss in more detail, I have also listed a series of “optional” papers.  These are meant for your reference, both to help you gain a broader perspective on particular areas, and to give you other works to consider for those topics which capture your interest.  I will occasionally refer to these papers as we go, and/or discuss a summary of major points, but do not expect you to have read them in detail.

 

2. Homework 

We will have approximately 3 homework assignments each week.  Examples of homework include writing up a one-page research idea; looking up a paper to determine its research impact; and writing a referee report.  Tentative due dates are listed on the attached course outline.

 

Course Outline

 

Date

Papers

Homework Due

Week 1, 5 Mar: Disclosure overview.  
     Beyer et al. (2010); Healy and Palepu (2001)

Optional:  Core (2001)

 
Week 1, 6 Mar: Does dicslosure matter?  Costs and benefits of disclosure.  Plus a discussion about the elements of a good introduction. One-page research idea based on Beyer et al (2010) or Healy & Palepu (2001).
     Botosan (1997); Graham et al (2005); Field et al. (2005)

Optional:  Kim and Skinner (2011)

 
Week 1, 7 Mar: Disclosure regulation. Critique an introduction.
     Heitzman et al. (2010); Baber and Gore (2008)

Optional references:  Bushman and Landsman (2010); Watts and Zimmerman (1986) – regulation chapter; Gore (2004) – see Figure 1; Leftwich (1980)

 
Week 1, 8 Mar: Impact of monitoring – unions and shareholder activism. One-page research idea is due, on any empirical financial topic.
   DeAngelo and DeAngelo (1991); Klasa et al. (2009); Del Guercio et al. (2008)

Optional: Leung et al. (2009); Farber et al. (2010); Karpoff (2001); Bainbridge (2005); Liberty and Zimmerman (1986)

 
Week 1, 9 Mar: Disclosure and debt markets (including under financial shocks). Present your 1-2 page research idea to the class:  this can be on any empirical financial topic, or (with instructor approval) something else you’re working on
Graham et al. (2008); Watts and Zuo (2011)

Optional:  Hutton et al. (2009); Campello et al. (2010)

 
Week 2, 16 Apr: Corporate governance overview. Paper assigned for which a referee report is due (on day 3)
   Armstrong et al. (2010); Adams et al. (2009).

Optional:  Hermalin and Weisbach (1998); Shleifer and Vishny (1998)

 
Week 2, 17 Apr: Governance determinants and measuring governance.  
   Linck et al. (2008); Larcker et al. (2007); Gompers et al. (2003)

Optional:  Klein (1998)

 
Week 2, 18 Apr: Political connections, performance, and accounting transparency.

 

 
     Faccio et al. (2006); Chaney et al. (2011)

Optional:  Blanes et al. (2010); Faccio (2006)

 
Week 2, 19 Apr: Nonprofit governance. Referee report due (from paper assigned on day 1)
     Aggarwal, Evans and Nanda (2011); Core et. al. (2006); Chen et al. (2011)

Optional:  Van Lent (2012)

 
Week 2, 20 Apr: How to make a good paper great (and how to get a decent one published). Research impact assignment due.
     Brown (2005); Zimmerman (1989); Clarkson (2012)

Optional:  Heck (2009)

 
     
     

 

Papers:

Week 1:

Baber and Gore, 2008.  Consequences of GAAP disclosure regulation:  evidence from municipal debt.  The Accounting Review 83 (3):  565-591.

Beyer, Cohen, Lys, and Walther, 2010. The financial reporting environment:  review of the recent literature.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 50:  296-343.

Botosan, 1997.  Disclosure level and the cost of equity capital.  The Accounting Review 72: 323-350.

DeAngelo and DeAngelo, 1991.  Union negotiations and corporate policy:  A study of labor concessions in the domestic steel industry during the 1980s.  Journal of Financial Economics 30:  3-43.

Del Guercio, Seery, and Woidtke, 2008.  Do boards pay attention when institutional investor activists ‘just vote no’?  Journal of Financial Economics 90:  84-103.

Field, Lowry, and Shu, 2005.  Does disclosure deter or trigger litigation?  Journal of Accounting and Economics 39:  487–507.

Graham, Harvey, and Rajgopal, 2005.  Economic implications of corporate financial reporting.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 40: 3-73.

Graham, Liu, and Qiu,  2008.  Corporate misreporting and bank loan contracting.  Journal of Financial Economics 89:  44-61.

Healy and Palepu, 2001.  Information asymmetry, corporate disclosure, and the capital markets:  a review of the empirical disclosure literature.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 31:  405-440.

Heitzman, Wasley, and Zimmerman,  2010.   The joint effects of materiality thresholds and voluntary disclosure incentives of firms’ disclosure decisions. Journal of Accounting and Economics 49: 109–132.

Klasa, Maxwell, and Ortiz-Molina,  2009.  The strategic use of corporate cash holdings in collective bargaining with labor unions.  Journal of Financial Economics 92:  421-442.

Watts and Zuo, 2011.  Accounting conservatism and firm value:  Evidence from the global financial crisis.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

 

Optional references (week 1):

Bainbridge, 2005.  Shareholder activism and institutional investors.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Bushman and Landsman, 2010.  The pros and cons of regulating corporate reporting:  a critical review of the arguments.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Campello, Graham, and Harvey, 2010.  The real effects of financial constraints:  Evidence from a financial crisis.  Journal of Financial Economics 97:  470-487.

Core, 2001.  A review of the empirical disclosure literature:  a discussion.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 31:  441.

Farber, Hsieh, Jung, and Li, 2010.  Labor unions and accounting conservatism.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Gore, 2004.  The effects of GAAP regulation and bond market interaction on local government Disclosure.  Journal of Accounting and Public Policy 23 (1):  23-52.  (See figure 1)

Karpoff, 2001.  The impact of shareholder activism on target companies: A survey of empirical findings.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Kim and Skinner, 2011.  Measuring securities litigation risk.  Journal of Accounting and Economics, forthcoming.

Klein, 1998.  Firm performance and board committee structure.  Journal of Law and Economics 41 (1):  275-303.

Leftwich, 1980.  Market failure fallacies and accounting information.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 2:  193-211.

Leung, Li, and Rui,  2009.  Labor union (sic) and accounting conservatism.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Liberty and Zimmerman, 1986.  Labor union contract negotiations and accounting choices.  The Accounting Review 61 (4):  692-712.

Watts and Zimmerman, 1986.  Positive Accounting Theory, disclosure regulation chapter, 156-178.

 

Week 2:

Adams, Hermalin, and Weisbach, 2009.  The role of boards of directors in corporate governance:  a conceptual framework and survey.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Aggarwal, Evans, and Nanda, 2011.  Nonprofit boards:  Size, performance and managerial incentives.  Journal of Accounting and Economics, forthcoming.

Armstrong, Guay, and Weber,  2010.  The role of information and financial reporting in corporate governance and debt contracting.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 50:  179-234.

Brown, 2005.  The importance of circulating and presenting manuscripts:  evidence from the accounting literature.  The Accounting Review 80: 55-83.

Chaney, Faccio, and Parsley, 2011.  The quality of accounting information in politically connected firms.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 51 (1-2):  58-76.

Chen, Kido, and Weber,  2011.  The influence of elections on the accounting choices of governmental entities.  Journal of Accounting Research conference paper, Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Clarkson, 2012.  Publishing:  Art or science?  Reflections from an editorial perspective.  Accounting and Finance, forthcoming; available on ssrn.

Core, Guay, and Verdi, 2006.  Agency problems of excess endowment holdings in not-for-profit firms.  Journal of Accounting and Economics 41:  307-333.

Faccio, McConnell, and Masulis, 2006.  Political connections and corporate bailouts.  Journal of Finance 61 (6):  2597-2635.

Gompers, Ishii, and Metrick, 2003.  Corporate governance and equity prices.  Quarterly Journal of Economics 118: 107-155.

Larcker, Richardson, and Tuna, 2007.  Corporate governance, accounting outcomes, and organizational performance.  The Accounting Review 82 (4):  963-1008.

Linck, Netter, and Yang, 2008.  The determinants of board structure.  Journal of Financial Economics 87:  308-328.

Zimmerman, 1989.  Improving a manuscript’s readability and likelihood of publication.  Issues in Accounting Education 4 (2):  458-466.

 

Optional references (week 2):

Blanes, Draca, and Fons-Rosen, 2010.  Revolving door lobbyists.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Faccio, 2006.  Politically connected firms.  American Economic Review 96 (1):  369-386.

Heck, 2009.  Most prolific authors in the accounting literature over the past half century:  1959-2008.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Hermalin and Weisbach, 1998.  Endogenously chosen boards and their monitoring of the CEO.  American Economic Review 88:  96-118.

Hutton, Marcus, and Tehranian,  2009.  Opaque financial reports, R2, and crash risk.  Journal of Financial Economics 94:  67-86.

Shleifer and Vishny, 1998.  Survey of corporate governance.  American Economic Review 88: 96-118.

Van Lent, 2012.  Discussion of the influence of elections on the accounting choices of governmental entities.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

 

General optional methodological pieces that you may use as references:

Lee and Lemieux, 2009.  Regression discontinuity designs in economics.  Unpublished working paper, ssrn.

Thompson, 2011.  Simple formulas for standard errors that cluster by both firm and time.  Journal of Financial Economics 99:  1-10.

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